Charleston Style and Design

FALL 2015

Issue link: http://charlestondesignmagazine.epubxp.com/i/579538

Contents of this Issue

Navigation

Page 257 of 291

256 CS D Annette says the company is also moving into automated hardware and rods, noting that "today, people want to touch their cellphones to move their curtains and Roman shades." Southern Shades works with individual homeowners, but most of its business comes from architectural and design frms. Sometimes those lines cross over. For example, the company has done work for both the per- sonal residence and commercial projects of Reggie Gibson of Reggie Gibson Architects in downtown Charleston. On aver- age, Southern Shades is invited to bid on fve to eight full-house projects a month. Inns, such as The King's Courtyard, and a number of Lowcountry restaurants are also among the company's clients, including Hall's Chop House, 492, High Cotton, The Obstinate Daughter, Beardcat's Sweet Shop and Rose's Diner. Velvet wallboards as well as other fabric wall treatments are among the projects the compa- ny has produced for restaurants seeking to establish an atmo- sphere of luxury. Because Southern Shades purchases fabrics directly from the mills, Annette says she's able to pass on substantial sav- ings to her clients. By ordering whole bolts—usually more than Margaret Locklair can be reached at locklair@homesc.com. SOUTHERN SHADES 210 Spotted Owl Lane Moncks Corner, SC 29461 843-553-2834 southernshadesdesign.com a project calls for—she can keep an inventory of fabrics in her shop that designers have come to count on. "Annette's got great taste," says business manager and design consultant Anna Romanosky. "She knows what looks good. She knows what's functional, and she'll tell you 'no' if she sees that a proposed project won't come together well." As an example, "I don't make drapes without both interlining and lining," says Annette. But that doesn't mean a project has to be elaborate. While she works often with linens, fax, burlap and sometimes bamboo, as well as silks, velvets and blends, she says: "I like cotton. It will last a lifetime. Simplicity sometimes is the best thing." Annette's goal is to expand Southern Shades, and she is proud of the people who expertly turn out the products the com- pany is known for. "I have the best crew I've ever had," she says. "This business is all about us, as a team, not about me." 2

Articles in this issue

Links on this page

Archives of this issue

view archives of Charleston Style and Design - FALL 2015